Tips for the 2019 Festival

Tips for the 2019 Festival

The 2019 Timpanogos Storytelling Festival officially kicks off next week and we are thrilled to be back at our new site at the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point. As with any new experience and location we have learned a few lessons, but lucky for you that means this year will be better than ever. We’ve tried to think through as many things as possible to give you a few tips that will hopefully help us all to have a wonderful weekend of storytelling.

Tip #1: Parking and Shuttles

The parking is plentiful at Thanksgiving Point and the parking staff is efficient. Guests will be directed to designated parking areas as they arrive at the Ashton Gardens. There will be a second entrance next to the Museum of Natural Curiosity, which will make it easier for guests who are parking in those lots. Patrons using this entrance should have purchased their tickets in advance.

For evening events at The Electric Park Pavilion and The Show Barn, you may park in any available parking stalls near the venues. When exiting, we highly recommend that you head south to access I-15 (rather than north where you will run into traffic exiting the gardens).

Parking in unmarked areas or on the street is not permitted. Carpooling is strongly recommended to help alleviate traffic congestion.

Avoid Traffic by riding UTA and using the free Shuttle
Tickets for the FrontRunner will be available for $3.75 per person per day during the festival. A shuttle will be running from the Lehi FrontRunner Station to the Festival from Thursday evening until Saturday evening.

The Thanksgiving Point Trolley will be running through the parking areas of the festival!

Tip #2: Food

As usual, Utah restaurants will serve breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, and drinks at the Festival. This year our vendors will line the rim of the Garden Amphitheater and will include several local restaurants as well as Thanksgiving Point Concessions. Most meals are around $10. In addition to these vendors, you also have the option of having a sit-down lunch or dinner (11:00 am to 7 pm Friday and Saturday) at The Trellis Café located at the Garden Visitor Center. Reservations are recommended for those wishing to eat at The Trellis Café and can be made by calling 801-768-4996.

Music will be available for those wishing to dine in or around the amphitheater, with tables set up just west of the amphitheater for your eating and listening pleasure. A few picnic tables are also available near the Thanksgiving Point concessions. Besides these designated eating areas, there are many beautiful areas in the gardens and we invite you to bring a blanket and enjoy the beauty of our new location. And, of course, you are welcome to bring your own food and drinks into the Gardens.

Concessions (no vendors) will also be available at the Electric Park location for Bedtime Stories and Laughin’ Night.

We anticipate that the traffic between the Ashton Garden’s and the entrance to I-15 will be busy (very, very busy) on Friday between 4pm and 6pm and so we (highly) encourage those coming for the day and staying for the evening to plan on not leaving the Festival site between our day and evening events. Instead, we welcome you to explore the gardens (feed the koi!), visit fanfare, and have a lovely picnic dinner (now easier than ever since you can easily run back to your car and grab a cooler full of your own food).

Tip #3: Bathrooms

We are (perhaps inordinately) excited for the many, many bathrooms available to us during the Festival. There are three bathroom locations (real bathrooms with actual running water!) that you will want to acquaint yourselves with upon arrival. The first (and largest) (and air conditioned) is located in the Garden Visitor Center (the main entrance to the Festival). The second is located along the rim of the Garden Amphitheater at the back of the Thanksgiving Point Concessions. And the third is located just south of the pottery tent.
And this year we have added new portable bathrooms for your added convenience. You can never have too many bathrooms. Am I right?

Tip #4: Amphitheater Seating

The Garden Amphitheater will be used this year for My Favorite Stories on Friday night and as one location of Laughin’ Night on Saturday night. The line for each of these events will start to form at 5 pm at the amphitheater and seating will open at 5:30. Any blankets, chairs, or other materials put out before 5 pm will be removed by Ashton Gardens’ staff before seating opens. Live music will begin at 7 pm.

For everyone’s convenience, the Garden Amphitheater is split into different sections: a blanket area (B), a low back chair area (no taller than 30 inches) (LB), a high back chair area (HB) and reserved seating. Each section will have a designated area that will be clearly marked (see picture below). If attendees are interested in having a chair for the performance, they can bring their own or rent one from Thanksgiving Point for $5. There will also be designated areas for wheelchair seating along the rim of the amphitheater.

Tip #5: Electric Park Seating

This one is an easy one: Electric Park will be chairs only and all chairs will be provided and set up prior to the storytelling.

As noted in the food tip, concessions (but no vendors) will also be available at the Electric Park.

Tip #6: Gates Open

Thursday, September 5:

Registration for the Conference begins at 8:30 am.

Gates open for Look Who’s Talking at 5:00 pm. (Live music begins at 6:00 pm.)

Friday, September 6:

Gates open for daytime events at 9:00 am. (Live music and puppetry performances begin at 9:30 am. Storytelling in the tents begins at 10:00 am.)

The line for My Favorite Stories at the Garden Amphitheater starts to form at 5:00 pm.
Amphitheater seating opens at 5:30 pm. (Live music starts at 7:00 pm with storytelling beginning at 8:00 pm.)

Gates open for Bedtime Stories at The Electric Park Pavilion at 5:30 pm. (A preshow performance starts at 5:45 pm with storytelling beginning at 6:30 pm.)

Gates open for Shivers in the Night at The Show Barn at 8:30 pm with storytelling beginning at 9:00 pm.

Saturday, September 7:

Gates open for daytime events at 9:00 am. (Live music and puppetry performances begin at 9:30 am. Storytelling in the tents begins at 10:00 am.)

The line for Laughin’ Night at the Garden Amphitheater starts to form at 5:00 pm.
Amphitheater seating opens at 5:30 pm. (Live music starts at 7:00 pm with storytelling beginning at 8:00 pm.)

Gates open for Laughin’ Night at The Electric Park Pavilion at 5:30 pm. (Live music starts at 7:00 pm with storytelling beginning at 8:00 pm.)

Tip #7: Miscellaneous

*Need your Festival peaches and ice cream fix? Thanksgiving Point Concessions at the Ashton Gardens is the place to pick up this Festival tradition.

*While average daytime temperatures are 80 F and above, early morning and evenings in the Gardens can be a little chilly so plan accordingly.

*Trying to map out your day and need a schedule and map right now? We have an app for that. You can also find this same map and schedule in the Festival program book, for those who prefer a physical copy. Just click on the bar to your right.

*Golf carts? Of course! Golf carts will be running on back paths from the Garden Visitor Center to the tent areas for those who need assistance.

*Pottery is open from 10:00 am to 11:30 am and 12:30 pm to 4:00 pm on Friday and Saturday. You can sign up at the Pottery tent which is located south of the Rose Garden Tent. The slots fill up fast so be sure to sign up early!

*At the end of the day, consider taking a few minutes to explore the gardens, share a few stories with your friends and family, and just generally let the traffic get moving before you join the throng. This year we will be opening all lanes of traffic at the end of Saturday’s Laughin’ Night to allow for a quicker exit of vehicles from the parking lots near the Amphitheater venue.

*We have an amazing group of volunteers that have made it possible for this Festival to happen for the last 30 years. If you see one of them, give them a smile and a quick thanks. I’m sure they would love it. Remember, patience, kindness and courtesy have been the hallmark of festival goers since it began. Let’s keep that tradition going.

*If you have questions or concerns during the Festival, the fastest way to get ahold of us is to find one of us wearing or a white Timpanogos Storytelling shirt with a lanyard around our necks or through Twitter or Instagram (@TimpFest)..

Get to Know Don White

Get to Know Don White

Don White is a storyteller-comedian-author-troubadour-folk singer-songwriter, and since it’s his first time performing at the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival we thought it would be nice if he could introduce himself to our Festival attendees so we asked him three questions.

1. This is our 30th anniversary and we’re so happy you will be celebrating this milestone with us. As a first-time teller at the festival, what would you like our audience to know about you?

“My performances used to be songs with little stories in between them. Over the past twenty years they became stories with little songs in between them. I like to go back and forth between being funny and being serious. I think humor that is friendly and not mean spirited is a very powerful tool for connecting with an audience. I’m interested in putting stories into the world through as many genres as possible. Whether I am singing or telling, being funny or serious, speaking plainly or poetically, I am always trying to serve the story so that it will find as many ears and hearts as possible.

Old people are hunched over by the weight of their untold stories.
If you encourage an old man to tell you his stories you will see his back straighten and his skin tighten quite discernibly with the telling of each one.
If an old woman could find an attentive ear for the dispensing of only one story each day she would be young again in the span of one year.

An odd world, don’t you think, where billions of stories live for year upon year in search of a place to be told?

Of what earthly good is a story without an ear to receive it, without a mind to be challenged by it, without a sense of wonder to marvel at it and, most importantly, without an open heart to possibly see the world differently after being moved by it?

It is something of a miracle to me that a body of ninety years can summon the strength to move one inch under the weight of ten thousand untold stories.”

2. Our theme this year is Timeless Tales. Would you consider your stories to be more timeless (traditional stories) or timely (personal narrative)?

“My stories and songs are drawn from my life. I’d like to think that the stories I tell from my life focus on universal themes.”

3. How can a new fan hear more from you after the festival? Do you have any published work, a website or other social media sites?

“I have a website: www.donwhite.net – and a facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Don-White-62176263069/ – My ten CDS, my two DVDs and my book are available on the website as well as lots of concert video for viewing.

You can see Don and all of the other tellers at the 30th Anniversary of the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival September 5-7, 2019 at the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point by purchasing tickets online or at the gate.

Antonio Rocha – On Timeless Tales

Antonio Rocha – On Timeless Tales

We recently interviewed Antonio Rocha (pronounced Haw-sha) and he gave us his thoughts on the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival, advice for new storytellers and the timelessness of storytelling.

Q- As you well know, this is our 30th anniversary and we’re so happy you will be celebrating this milestone with us. As a veteran of the festival would you please share some of your memories of the festival?

A- I have many wonderful memories of being at Timpanogos: the setting, the people all creating an awesome Festival atmosphere. As one of the Nation’s top festivals with incredibly dedicated listeners and staff, Timpanogos delivers a setting where I can relax to do my work for I know I will be well taken care of. I have also a great memory of resting between sets in the green room and getting a revitalizing massage. Timpanogos is the only festival to offer massages in the green room. What a great treat! I understand it’s not offered anymore, but it was a great memory. With all these amazing qualities, it is hard not have have great memories.

Q- What is one piece of advice you could give our young tellers or anyone who would like to share their stories?

A- Storytelling is not about words, it is about the images the story creates in your imagination. So, the more immersed you are in the imagery world of your story, be it fictional or not, the better will be your telling. Dive deep into the imaginary and you will never be lost for words and enthusiasm to tell about it.

Q- Our theme this year is Timeless Tales. In what way do you think storytelling is timeless or timely?
Storytelling is timeless because we are the only species on Earth who use story. They have been our companions, teachers and care givers for millennia.

A- Storytelling is timely because we, as a species, tend to spend too much time forgetting what being human is all about. Stories remind us of our humanity. Storytelling is the new fire we sit around of in order to keep us warm.

Join us on September 5-7, 2019 at The Gardens at Thanksgiving Point for the 30th Anniversary of the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival. Ticket prices increase August 1st, so get your today!

Tim Lowry – Timeless Tales and our 30th Anniversary

Tim Lowry – Timeless Tales and our 30th Anniversary

Our theme this year is Timeless Tales, a perfect theme for our 30th year don’t you think? For thirty years we have been celebrating the timeless tradition of storytelling and the timeless stories that transcend the generations. As part of this celebration we have asked our returning veteran tellers to give us some thoughts on the theme and on what the Festival means to them. We’ll begin our series with Tim Lowry.

Q- As you well know, this is our 30th anniversary and we’re so happy you will be celebrating this milestone with us. As a veteran of the Festival would you please share with us some of your memories of the Festival?

A- Of all the festivals in which I’ve been privileged to tell, Timpanogos best fulfills the promise of a “family event.” I love the wide mix of age groups that you see in the audience and on the stage. You have young children listening as older children tell; teenagers and college students telling. There’s juggling, and playing music, and presenting puppet plays; parents and grandparents cheering the young folks and also sharing stories. Everyone is involved in every way!

Q- What is one piece of advice you could give our young tellers or anyone who would like to share their stories?

A- I like to think of stories as wonderful treasures or marvelous discoveries that are best shared with others. Whether you sing, speak, or dance, generosity of spirit is essential to good storytelling. Love the story enough to treasure it, love your audience enough to share your treasure with them. Don’t worry about yourself—Will my voice shake? Will I mess up? Will they like me? Just love your story and love the people who have come to listen. Storytelling is an act of love!

Q- Our theme this year is Timeless Tales. In what way do you think storytelling is timeless or timely?

A- Timeless Tales! Oh, that makes me think of so many classics—Moses’s Pentateuch, the four New Testament Gospels, Arabian Nights, The Brothers Grimm, the Canterbury Tales of Chaucer, Aesop’s Fables, Mother Goose, Robin Hood Legends, Stories from Dickens and Twain, the Greek myths, Norse legends, and Cinderella. We mustn’t forget Cinderella! So many stories! So many voices! And yet one message—See! Hear! Wonder! (I’ll try to come back down to earth in time for the 30th annual Festival!)

Join us September 5-7, 2019 for the 30th Anniversary of the Timpanogos Storytelling Festival at The Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point.

Daniel Morden Q&A

Daniel Morden Q&A

Daniel Morden respects the power of a great story, stories that have stood the test of time, sifted through generations of tellers until the words and message have been polished smooth. When I listen to his Welsh accent carefully crafting tales I fall in love with words all over again. From Greek and Celtic myths to Jack stories to Welsh folktales, Daniel explores it all. He lights up dark places so we can peer into the corners.

 

Get to know him a little better by reading his answers to our five questions.

 

1. At TimpFest we are very family oriented, will you tell us a little about your family?

 

I live in Wales with my wife Marion and our two sons, Benjamin (11) and Joseph (9). The boys are both soccer mad. As long as they have a patch of grass where they can kick a ball, they are happy. We have a story club in our home, where adults and children share traditional stories. My eldest son won a contest for his storytelling last year. The boys love festivals. Ben likes discovering new acts. Joe likes discovering new food!

 

2. If you weren’t a professional storyteller, what would you be doing instead?

 

Probably a teacher. As my sons grow up, I realise what an important and rewarding job it is. Their teachers have had an enormous influence on them.3. Do you get nervous when you tell stories on stage? If so, what do you do to overcome your fear? If not, what is the key to your fearlessness? I get nervous, particularly in front of thousands of people. What do I do? – I trust the stories. I am just a conduit for a tale that has charmed, chilled, or thrilled audiences for hundreds-sometimes thousands- of years. If I can get out of my own way then the story will work its magic. And just before I go onstage I think of the most inspired teller I ever saw, Brother Blue. He was an extraordinary performer, consumed by delight in words and ideas. I remember his passion and try to copy it.

 

3. Do you get nervous when you tell stories on stage? If so, what do you do to overcome your fear? If not, what is the key to your fearlessness?

 

I get nervous, particularly in front of thousands of people. What do I do?- I trust the stories. I am just a conduit for a tale that has charmed, chilled or thrilled audiences for hundreds-sometimes thousands-of years. If I can get out of my own way then the story will work its magic.

 

4. What is the most embarrassing thing that you have done or has happened to you on stage?

I got the hiccups once….’Once upon a (hic) time….’

 

And a bonus question: How did you get your start in storytelling?

 

My Dad read to me and my brother when we were children. I remember him sitting at the end of my bed, I remember the sound of his voice. His words became pictures in my head. We went to Middle Earth, the wild west, Asgard, WW2 Poland: many extraordinary places. A wardrobe wasn’t the portal that took me to Narnia, or a beanstalk to the land of a giant. It was a voice. Every time I tell a story I am attempting to reproduce that experience for the audience. To give them what I had.

 

You can catch Daniel at the 2018 Timpanogos Storytelling Festival on September 6-8 (that’s next weekend!) at the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi. Utah. For tickets, click here https://timpfest.org/

Listen to a podcast of Daniel Morden at a telling at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesborough at  http://www.9thstory.com/tatterhood/

 


 

Clare Murphy Q&A

Clare Murphy Q&A

Timpanogos Storytelling Festival is lucky enough to welcome back Clare Murphy, a self-described storyteller, performer, writer, dramaturg, curiosist, teacher, consultant, wanderer, wonderer and maker who has performed around the world. Her lilting Irish accent will remind you that her roots are from a country with one of the richest folktale traditions in the world. I was enchanted by Clare when she came to our festival a few years back and I’ve been excited to see her again ever since. We asked Clare to share some of her insights on her pathway to story.

Our theme this year is “Pathways to Story.”How would you describe your pathway to becoming a storyteller? Was it a road, a back alley, a fast track, or a meandering trail?

It was something between a back alley, a fast track and straying from the mainpath of life.

Could you tell us about someone who has influenced you on this journey as a storyteller?

My father was an actor, on the side.  He didn’t do acting fulltime as it was the 70s and he had four kids.  But I saw many of his performances, and got to go backstage and meet the actors.  We would help him rehearse his lines and discuss the plays afterwards.  My mother is a poet.  Our house was filled with books of poetry and stories.  She taught me much about how to appreciate language.

I was introduced to storytelling as a world by Liz Weir.  She generously invited me to her home and allowed me to shadow her for three days.  She went on to encourage me throughout the years to keep going and tell me about a lot of opportunities.

I was also influenced by John Moriarty, an Irish writer and storyteller.  His deep connection to myth had a profound affect on me.

What are you passionate about outside of storytelling?

The planet and our responsibility as a part of Nature.  

Kindness to each other and other species.  I am passionate about art as a means of rehumanising us.  I love dancing.  and also chocolate, especially dark chocolate (70% + cocoa). 

I love the joy of improvisation, the kindness of creativity.

Where does storytelling go from here? How do you see its influence on society?

Storytelling is exactly where it needs to be. It is in every pocket of the world.  It has become a buzzword and its’ popularity is only growing.  It influences society in every sphere: politics, art, climate change, education, love.  People use story to support their ideologies.  The hope is that the stories of love, tolerance, compassion, inclusion, kindness that bring together all human beings regardless of gender, politics or religion are the stories that will help us move forward.

What fictional place would you most like to visit?

Ursula K LeGuin’s EarthSea.

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Don’t miss Clare at the 2018 Timpanogos Storytelling Festival September 6-8 at the Ashton Gardens at Thanksgiving Point in Lehi, Utah. For tickets and volunteer opportunities visit timpfest.org.

Timpanogos Storytelling Institute
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Provo, UT 84604

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